What do you want? What’s standing in your way?

Today is a good days ask yourself “What do you want?  What’s standing in your way?”

  • Faith is a state of mind.
  • Knowledge needs an action plan.

 Kimberly Pringle – Law of Success Coach, Associate Financial Advisor

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What happens when the holder of a TFSA dies? (Advantage of Segregated Funds)

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Sun Life Financial / January 2, 2018

François Bernier, notary and director, advanced planning with Sun Life Financial, looks at a topic that’s getting people talking.

 Think you know all there is to know about the Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)? You might be surprised. The process of transferring TFSA proceeds on the account owner’s death isn’t always clearly understood.

A HEFTY TFSA COULD PACK A BIG TAX PUNCH.

An investor who has never contributed to a TFSA can deposit $52,000 in 2017.1 “Since the growth is tax-sheltered, some investors could eventually end up with an account containing more than $100,000,” says Bernier. And that’s why we’re now starting to see this topic in the news more often, as a sizable TFSA can have a substantial financial impact at death.

THE BASICS: A QUICK REVIEW

When the owner of a TFSA dies, the money in the TFSA becomes accessible to the owner’s estate, with no tax impact, if no successor holder or beneficiaries exist. If the account owner decides to leave the TFSA proceeds to one or more of their children, the amount accumulated up to the date of death will be non-taxable, and the heirs can use it as they wish. However, if the heirs want to transfer the money into their own TFSA, they’ll have to be careful not to exceed their remaining contribution room.

If the deceased owner of a TFSA had named their surviving spouse (married or common law) as the beneficiary to their TFSA, the spouse can take advantage of what is referred to as an “exempt contribution.” This means that the spouse can transfer the current balance in the TFSA — its fair market value, in other words — into their own TFSA, even if all of their available contribution room has already been used. “Subject to completing a form RC240 (Designation of an Exempt Contribution — Tax-Free Savings Account) and filing it within 30 days of applying the contribution to their own TFSA, that is,” Bernier clarifies.2

AN EXAMPLE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS

At the time of his death in June 2017, John owned a TFSA that contained a total amount of $52,000. His spouse, Mary, can complete the form in question and add this $52,000 to her own TFSA, even if she has already contributed the maximum she’s allowed.

“However, there could be some capital appreciation between the date of death and the date the funds are transferred. Transfers like this don’t happen in a day. The deadline for completing the rollover to the spouse is December 31 of the year following the year of death,” explains Bernier.

Mary has the option of transferring the fair market value of her deceased husband’s TFSA, which is invested in mutual funds, into her own account before December 31, 2018. Keep in mind, however, that any capital appreciation that happens between those two dates will be taxable. If, for example, there’s a huge upswing in the markets and the TFSA’s value skyrockets to $62,000 during the 18 months in question, the result would be an amount of $10,000 that is taxable to Mary. Any capital appreciation after John’s death is considered interest income, which is subject to taxation and is not included in the rollover to the surviving spouse.

THE ADVANTAGE OF SEGREGATED FUND PRODUCTS

A key advantage of choosing an insurance product for a TFSA is the ability to appoint a beneficiary right in the insurance contract. If the spouse is named beneficiary, a death claim is paid, and the spouse then transfers the money to their own TFSA.3If the spouse is named in the contract as the successor holder, they become the owner of the TFSA. “On John’s death, if the money is invested in a segregated fund product, there would be a direct transfer of the assets to Mary, as the successor holder of the contract. In that case, the tax impact we outlined in the situation above would be eliminated,” says Bernier. Also, as successor holder, the client wouldn’t have to fill out a form RC240.

“Remember, too, that with a beneficiary designation, the money invested in segregated fund products passes outside the estate, meaning that it is paid promptly and directly to the beneficiary appointed in the insurance contract,” he adds.

On the topic of beneficiaries, there is a subtle difference for clients in Quebec. In Canada, regardless of which institution issues the TFSA, clients can designate their spouse (married or common law) as the successor holder of the plan or beneficiary. In Quebec, however, only insurance products, including segregated fund products, allow a successor holder or beneficiary to be named in the contract. Another way of looking at it is that clients can name a beneficiary for non-insurance products across Canada, except in Quebec.

An important note

With segregated fund products, if a spouse is the successor owner of the TFSA, no death benefit is payable, and the death benefit guarantee won’t be available. Sometimes, it’s better to name the spouse as the beneficiary.

 

Fire Alarm at 6 AM

At 6 am this morning the fire alarm in my building went off.  Me and my cat ‘Steve’ are on the 11th floor of a 15 story high rise.  steveWe were up late last night watching the Edmonton Oilers loose another hockey game and the Houston Astros win the World Series.  6 am is usually the time I get up for work – but getting up to a Fire Alarm is not a Zen way to start the day.

As I jumped out of bed my mother’s voice came into my head – Kim make sure you are waring good Pajama’s when you go to bed because there could be a fire and you will have fire fighters at  your door.   (Note to self – buy better pajamas)

I grabbed my purse, my phone and Steve.  As I was putting Steve into his cat carrier I remembered that I had planned to buy a new cat carrier because the last road trip we did to “Grandma’s House in Kingston” Steve barley fit into his cat carrier.  So at 6 AM he was not going willingly.

So there I was standing outside my building in the rain this am with nothing but, my purse, my phone & Steve surrounded by 100’s of other people from the building.  I was standing safely in the rain with the fire trucks, fire alarms going off, lights flashing and I was not worried.

In fact I was quite calm because I knew that no matter what happened with the fire – I was going to have a safe place to sleep that tonight, I would have extra money for additional living expenses & food, I would have money to replace all my furniture and I was protected for liability if the fire started in my unite.

I have ALL THAT PEACE OF MIND FOR $31/MONTH because I had insurance.

For people who have condo’s as their principle residence or for people who rent apartments the cost of insurance is apx $22-$40/month.

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I’m sharing my story with you this morning in the hopes that it may help you or someone you love.  Please talk to a Licenced Insurance Advisor today about Tenants Insurance or Condo insurance.

If your fire alarm went off at 6 AM tomorrow – would you be OK?

Kimberly Pringle – Associate Financial Advisor  613-258-2020

Axe Throwing Tournament!


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2nd Annual        

 “GET OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE”

  Axe Throwing Tournament

Presented by:

Kimberly Anne Pringle – Associate Financial Advisor & Law of Success Mastermind Coach

 

“No matter what your personal goal is – no one person can do it alone. You need to attract people into your life who will move you forward towards that dream. ” 

6 years ago I made the City of Ottawa my home.  I did not know anyone when I moved here.  So I set out to build some ‘social equity’  and get to know some fun people!  The city of Ottawa has been wonderful to me and I am very grateful for all the people I have met over the years.

I wanted to organize and event to bring some of the GREAT people I have met together – have fun, do something very different to help everyone ‘Get Out Of Your Comfort Zone’ – because nothing great ever happens in your comfort zone.

What could be more fun than an Insurance Advisor organizing an event to throw axes that includes a fully licensed bar.

Back by Popular demand – Kimberly Pringle’s 2nd annual ‘Get out of your comfort zone’ Axe Throwing tournament.

What to Expect

Events last 2 – 2.5 hours and are hosted by BATL coaches in a private throwing area. Things begin with practice and instruction before starting a group tournament.

Backyard Axe Throwing League’s Ottawa venue offers a fully licensed bar and kitchen serving a selection of local beers, wine and coolers

** Please note – this is not a networking event for people to prospect for clients or sell products.  I request that everyone respect this ‘no sales zone’

DATE

Sat, Nov 11, 2017 at 6 PM

GUESTS

Invitational

COST                        $42.86 +tax / person

ADDRESS

2615 Lancaster Road, Units 29 & 30, Ottawa, K1B 5N2

Email

lawofsuccesscoach@gmail.com

Mindfulness •Watch Your Mind For 5 Minutes: Yeah, it’s often a crazy mess of thoughts you take wayyyy too seriously.

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5 Secrets To Making Your Mind Happy

by Eric Barker

What would be nice is to have a perspective that helps your brain deal with all of these negative emotions. And there may be one — and you’ve probably heard the name a lot lately: Mindfulness. And research shows it works.Dan Harris is the anchor of Good Morning America and author of 10% Happier, where he recounts his journey from mindfulness skeptic to believer. Joseph Goldstein and Sharon Salzberg are two of the most well-known mindfulness teachers. I spoke to each of them to learn more.You and I are gonna walk through the first few steps on how to be more mindful so you don’t just sound like Merriam-Webster, but you really understand what the deal is and how to do it.

  • 1) Watch Your Mind For 5 Minutes Comically, it will act like something is The Biggest Problem Ever, then bounce to something completely different and think that’s The Biggest Problem Ever. And it will repeat this cycle endlessly.When you really watch your mind bouncing around and getting worked up, there is only one conclusion you can come to: “I am utterly insane.”Nothing in life is as important as you think it is while you are thinking about it.People spend 46.9 percent of their waking hours thinking about something other than what they’re doing, and this mind-wandering typically makes them unhappy… “Mind-wandering is an excellent predictor of people’s happiness,” Killingsworth says. “In fact, how often our minds leave the present and where they tend to go is a better predictor of our happiness than the activities in which we are engaged.”… Time-lag analyses conducted by the researchers suggested that their subjects’ mind-wandering was generally the cause, not the consequence, of their unhappiness.(To learn how to be happier and more successful, click here.)
  • 2) You Are Not Your ThoughtsAnd this causes a lot of unhappiness. Your arm lifts stuff. Just like your brain produces thoughts. That’s what it does. And as you well know, some of those thoughts are ridiculous. That doesn’t mean that’s who you are.Anybody who’s paid any attention to their minds will know throughout the day there’s a run of thoughts going through our heads. Usually, we’re quite caught up in them and identified with them. We take them to be who we are. Without mindfulness, we’re lost in the dream of our thoughts in these mind created worlds and we’re not even aware that that’s what’s happening, we’re so enmeshed in them.You need to do this more often, rather than assuming just because it’s in your head, it’s you and it’s to be taken seriously. Here’s Sharon Salzberg:I look at it like this: “See and not be.” Recognize the worries, frustrations or fears as just thoughts. They don’t have to be you.Okay, we know the thoughts are just thoughts. But what do we do once we see’em?Okay, you’re not your thoughts but they are still there. Give the feeling a name. Label it.Naming it helps you frame it and separate it from being “you.” And it can reduce the emotional component and help you relax. Here’s Joseph:In meditation this is called “noting.” But is it some esoteric practice only meditators do? Nope. I’m seeing versions of this everywhere and from very reputable sources.From The Upward Spiral:And hostage negotiators use labeling to reduce negative emotions when they deal with criminals.Okay, you labeled your thought and it reduced the emotional impact. Good
  • .4) Don’t Just React To Thoughts. Decide.And so you probably just said things you don’t mean and did things that will make you unhappy in the long term, right? (The word “impulsive” is rarely a compliment.)From Joseph’s book, Mindfulness:Before you impulsively react to a thought (and maybe blurt out something stupid or do something rash), just ask yourself one simple question:Here’s Joseph:And Sharon adds:Telling yourself what you just did was dumb might be harsh but it might lead you to get your act together. Telling yourself you’re dumb 400 times in 15 minutes? Um, is that useful?(To learn how to do mindfulness meditation, click here.)5) Be CompassionateTo be compassionate you have to be able to get close to someone’s pain. But often this is too intense. It hurts to see someone you love suffer. Your brain’s impulsive reaction can be: “PAIN BAD. RUN AWAY.”Mindfulness has a key role in the development of compassion. In the face of suffering, compassion is that desire of, “How can I help in this situation?” What’s necessary for compassion to arise is a willingness to come close to the suffering and this is not always easy to do. Very often in the face of suffering you don’t want to see it because it’s unpleasant. Mindfulness allows us to let it in and when we let it in and come close to it, that’s precisely the condition for compassion to arise.Time to round all this info up and learn the most powerful method for increasing mindfulness…Here’s how to be more mindful and happy:
  • Sum Up
  • (To learn how to get people to like you — from an FBI behavior expert, click here.)
  • You need to not be overwhelmed by the feeling in order to remedy it and mindfulness helps you keep that distance so you can be of help. Here’s Joseph:
  • Mindfulness makes compassion easier. How, you ask? Well, if you faint at the sight of blood, you won’t be a good surgeon.
  • So we’ve dealt a lot with how mindfulness helps you cope with the negative. Enough defense. Time for some offense. How does mindfulness boost happiness?
  • You miss your flight. Your first reaction might be to take the anger inside you and vent it on the person at the airline’s front desk. I gotta ask: is that useful?
  • What we’re talking about with mindfulness is not in any way eradicating thoughts or annihilating them, but being able to have a little bit of space so we can make a clear decision: “Do I want to nurture this or do I want to let it go?”
  • Where is this action leading? Do I want to go there? …This thought which has arisen, is it helpful? Is it serving me or others in some way or is it not? Is it just playing out perhaps old conditions of fear or judgment or things that are not very helpful for ourselves or others? Mindfulness really helps us both see and discern the difference and then it becomes the foundation then for making wiser choices and why the choices lead to more happiness. It’s really simple. It’s not easy to do, but it’s very simple.
  • “Is it useful?”
  • …contrary to some popular beliefs, our aim should be not to follow the heart but to train the heart. All of us have a mix of motivations; not everything in our hearts is wise or wholesome. The great power of mindful discernment allows us to abandon what is unwholesome and to cultivate the good. This discernment is of inestimable value for our happiness and wellbeing.
  • Following your heart is good. But first we need to train the heart, or we may follow impulsive desires that get us into trouble.
  • You have emotional thoughts, you assume they are “you” and BOOM, you immediately act based on them…
  • But what’s the point of all this? To allow yourself to deal with your thoughts effectively and make better decisions in your life which will make you happier and more productive. And that comes down to a very simple principle…
  • (To learn the 4 rituals neuroscientists say will make you happier, click here.)
  • …in one fMRI study, appropriately titled “Putting Feelings into Words” participants viewed pictures of people with emotional facial expressions. Predictably, each participant’s amygdala activated to the emotions in the picture. But when they were asked to name the emotion, the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex activated and reduced the emotional amygdala reactivity. In other words, consciously recognizing the emotions reduced their impact.
  • Neuroscientists have done research showing how powerful giving an emotion a name can be in curbing bad feelings.
  • It’s almost like a frame around a picture. The point is not to look at the frame, but the frame helps focus our attention so we see the picture more clearly.
  • “I’m feeling angry.” or “I’m feeling worried.”
  • 3) Label Your Thoughts And Feelings
  • (To learn what the happiest people in the world do every day, click here.)
  • I think one of the issues that we have is that we don’t necessarily recognize that a thought is just a thought. We have a certain thought, we take it to heart, we build a future on it, we think, “This is the only thing I’ll ever feel”, “I’m an angry person and I always will be”, “I’m going to be alone for the rest of my life”, and that process happens pretty quickly.
  • You already know this… but selectively. Sometimes, you’ll say, “I’m not really angry, I’m just tired.” Boom. That’s a teensy bit of mindfulness right there. (See? You’re already good at it.)
  • This distinction is central to mindfulness. Here’s Joseph Goldstein:
  • Neuroscientist Alex Korb made an interesting distinction when I spoke to him. If you were to break your arm you would not tell people, “I am broken.” But when we feel anger we’re quick to say, “I am angry.”
  • Now that you’re aware this is going on, what can you do to stop your mind from bouncing around taking all these negative thoughts so seriously? First you need to understand something…
  • Call me “Captain Obvious” if you like, but this is not good.
  • And research by Harvard happiness expert Daniel Gilbert shows that a wandering mind is not a happy mind:
  • But this process, sadly, is quite normal. As Nobel Prize winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman has said:
  • If this was a character in a movie you’d laugh at them for not seeing the pattern and continuing to take each thing so seriously. But normally you don’t notice it. And I don’t need to add that this is no prescription for happiness.
  • It just ping-pongs all over the place. And when you’re moody, it takes everything so seriously.
  • So what’s a good place to start? Let’s see what mindfulness is not. A good example is probably, well… your brain. (Sorry about that.)
  • Now here’s the part where I give you an actual definition of mindfulness, right? Wrong. It’s kinda like defining “love” or “art.” Hard to really capture it all in one sentence. So I’m gonna do you one better…
  • Three big names in the field have collaborated to produce an app that can teach you how to be more mindful. (You can check it out here.)
  • Sometimes it seems like your brain just sits around creating lousy feelings and worries. You want this, you’re frustrated about that, you’re annoyed about some other thing and the list never stops. And it makes it impossible to be happy.
  • Watch Your Mind For 5 Minutes: Yeah, it’s often a crazy mess of thoughts you take wayyyy too seriously.
  • You Are Not Your Thoughts: If you had a broken arm, you wouldn’t say, “I am broken.”
  • Label Your Thoughts And Feelings: Put a frame around them. This dampens the emotions.
  • Don’t Just React To Thoughts. Decide: Ask yourself, “Is it useful?”
  • Be Compassionate: Only by being able to get close to the pain of others can you really help them.Plenty of research shows the benefits of meditating but what’s its connection to mindfulness, you ask?
  • Meditation helps you practice the elements of mindfulness in a very controlled setting. It’s like going to the gym for your mindfulness muscles:
  • You’re not gonna be the Mayor of Mindfulness City by tomorrow. It takes time. But you’ll get better. And something that really helps is meditation.
  • By quietly focusing on your breath you see those random thoughts bubble up and you learn to let them go.
  • You use “noting” to label troublesome thoughts.
  • You strengthen your attention by continually returning to concentrating on your breathing when you get distracted. Stronger attention means less mind-wandering and more happiness.When you believe you are your thoughts, it can lead to a lot of unhappiness. It’s a mistake. Sharon told me a heartwarming story about a mistake someone else made:See the thoughts, don’t be the thoughts. Label’em. And then decide if they’re useful. If they make your life better, if they’re compassionate, then the answer is yes.Join over 300,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.How To Get People To Like You: 7 Ways From An FBI Behavior ExpertNew Harvard Research Reveals A Fun Way To Be More SuccessfulAdvice, MindfulnessEric Barker
  • The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Learn more or join us as a community member!
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  • Originally published at www.bakadesuyo.com
  • New Neuroscience Reveals 4 Rituals That Will Make You Happy
  • Related posts:
  • If you’re mindful, it can be a doggy-dog world.
  • This young woman said to me recently that her whole young life she had thought that the expression was, “It’s a doggy-dog world,” and then someone told her, “No, it’s a dog-eat-dog world,” and she was horrified. She said, “No, I don’t want it to be a dog-eat-dog world! I want it to be a doggy-dog world!”
  • But whether you meditate or not, what’s most important is getting some distance from your thoughts, deciding which ones are useful, which ones will make you and others happy, and acting on them.
 Rob Carrick
August 4, 2017August 2, 2017

Living alone is bad for your personal finances.

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From a basic sharing of expenses to the availability of tax breaks, you’re better off financially if you have a spouse, partner or roommate. But as 2016 census data shows, singles now account for the biggest slice of Canadian households. Possible trend of the future: The relationship of financial convenience, where people of all ages live together to save money.

As chair of the Ottawa chapter of CARP, a group representing retired people, Janet Gray hears from a lot of senior women about discrimination against singles. “They say there’s an injustice – almost a penalty – for being single,” said Ms. Gray, who is a financial planner with Money Coaches Canada.

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Read more: Census 2016: More Canadians than ever are living alone, and other takeaways

Retired couples can take advantage of pension-income splitting, where a higher-income spouse or common-law partner shares up to half of his or her pension with the lower-income spouse/partner to reduce taxes. Payments from a registered pension plan can be split before age 65 or later, while payments from a registered retirement income fund or registered retirement savings plan can be split at 65 and older. There’s no similar opportunity to save when you’re a single retiree.
The financial disadvantages of being single are especially noticeable in retirement, but they’re significant even for millennials. Ms. Gray said a single person would typically qualify for a smaller mortgage than a couple, which limits the ability to buy in expensive housing markets such as Vancouver or Toronto.

“At 35, you could find yourself buying a first house and having to go to mom and dad to ask, can you co-sign for me?” she said. “It’s kind of demoralizing.”

The old cliché about two living as cheaply as one may be exaggerated, but Ms. Gray figures that singles pay 75 to 80 per cent of the costs incurred by a couple. Whether one or two adults live in a home, major costs like mortgage payments, property taxes, utilities and maintenance are the same.

There are some additional tax breaks beyond pension-income splitting that benefit couples, not singles. Here are a few highlighted by Mark Goodfield, a partner at the accounting firm BDO Canada LLP:

The spouse or common-law partner amount: This tax credit is claimable if you support a spouse or common-law partner with income of less than $11,635 for 2017.
Medical expenses: Partners can combine their medical expenses to get the most benefit from this tax credit.
Charitable donations: Donations by spouses can be combined so that they qualify for the enhanced tax credit available to charitable giving of amounts above $200 ( a lesser credit applies for smaller donations).
Adam Morke, an accountant with Stern Cohen, said there aren’t as many tax breaks for couples as people think. “Canada’s income tax system is, generally speaking, designed around taxing individuals as opposed to couples,” he said in an e-mail. The idea that couples are hugely advantaged may come from the United States, where there’s more opportunity for them to save on tax.

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It was Ms. Gray, the financial planner, who floated the idea of the relationship of financial convenience. It’s a concept that may be particularly well suited to expensive cities where both houses and rental accommodations are expensive. Achieving financial independence as a young adult in these locations may depend on some kind of sharing of expenses.

The 2016 census data found that almost 35 per cent of people between the ages of 20 and 34 lived with at least one parent, up from 30.6 per cent in 2001. Between a challenging job market and pricey housing, young adults are increasingly having to rely on family for financial support.

Having a roommate seems like a university or college thing, but maybe it’s time to consider it as an option at all ages. Pension-income splitting isn’t available to roommates, but they can pool their financial resources to afford the high cost of housing and enjoy the emotional benefits of companionship. Don’t they say that one is the loneliest number?

 

 

3 Ways Your Past Wins Are Blocking Your Future Successes

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Its easier to bask in the glow of the glory days than it is to put in the hard work to defend your spot at the top.

I’m tired of hearing stories that start like this: “Back in the day, I used to kill it.” Every time I hear someone say that, I think to myself, “Why did you stop killing it, then?” Let’s be real. No one ever says, “I want to be successful for a short period of time.” That’s not how the game works.

I have a theory why back-in-the-day stories are plenty and present-day wins are few: Winning isn’t easy. If it were, there would be no losers.

1. You fear starting over.
Winning takes hard work, focus, dedication, time, pain and finesse. Oftentimes, when someone has put in the effort to win, they fear starting over and winning again. After all, it’s hard work. Remember those folks who peaked in high school or college? They won one championship and celebrated it for the rest of their lives, even though they gave up on going to the big leagues.

The sales field is full of people who’ve won in the past but have written off their hopes of winning in the future. I hear people say, “But the rules changed” or “It’s not possible these days.” It’s all bullshit. It’s much easier to win once and retire than it is to turn around and defend the title. Most people — maybe even you — glory in knowing you won once. You should be focusing instead on how to remain the champ.

But guess which pays better? Is it retirement or championship?

2. You’re uncoachable.
Even worse (and I notice this the most) are those who have won in the past and refuse to be coached on how to win in the future. It’s as if previous wins inflated their egos so much, they can’t admit they need help to win again — even if it means helping themselves. “I know that” is one of the most dangerous phrases. While most people know everything, few choose to implement knowledge.

As I always say: “Knowledge + action = success.”

Realize this: There are no champions without coaches.

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Knowing it all isn’t the problem, but lack of application and action can become serious obstacles to overcome. Knowing what to do and actually doing it are two different things. You need a coach to help you practice and perfect what you do know. Find a good one to keep you accountable, and accept his or her criticism along with the praise.

3. You’re lying to yourself about what’s possible.
Most people believe what was possible back in the day is possible no longer. But we live in a time of advancement, not regression. Anything that was possible in the past is easier to accomplish in the present. It’s all a matter of mindset and making shifts over time, not fighting them.

The good-old days are now, and the sooner you realize it, the better.

I work with a lot of mortgage-loan officers. They usually talk about how good they had it before 2009. Which is complete nonsense. Everyone had it good in mortgages pre-2009. Money was everywhere and unregulated. If you could breathe, you could get a loan. When it stopped being easy, only champions pushed through. Most gave up and just accepted their peak had passed.

Yet here we are, years later, and many in the mortgage business never have out-earned their pre-2009 incomes — even though we live in the best time to be in the mortgage business. They let their past success hinder their future earnings. It’s a huge upper-limit mental block. And it’s not just loan officers, either. I hear it from nearly every sales position.

You have the power to win again.
Are you starting to think I’m describing you? Did you crush it in one place or another in the past but can’t seem to start winning again? I feel you. Most salespeople face this fear at least once during their careers. You have to know it starts with your mindset. You must believe your past wins were training exercises for your future championship. Believe you deserve to win and be willing to do the work.

The moment you think you know what it takes but decide not to do it is the moment you shift from winner to loser. It’s can be a hard pill to swallow.

My job is not always easy. But some of you need to read the truth: You’ve decided to relent, and that’s not the real you. It’s the scared version of you — the one you’ve let yourself become.

Start by building up wins in the present. Where and what can you win right now? Can you win top producer? Win over five more clients? Or win the day with your boss and patch things up? Think about a few small wins that are realistic to achieve. Then, go after them — and use those victories to gain momentum for bigger wins.

It’s time to forget about past accomplishments. They’re over and done, and no one is basking in the glow of that phase of your life. If you’re not winning in present, you’re doing it wrong. You weren’t put here on earth to talk for the rest of your life about successes that happened 10 years ago.

It’s time to put in the work again, my friend. The past is over, and now is when you create your future.

Ryan Stewman
Ryan Stewman, the “hardcore closer,” is a best-selling author, podcaster and blogger.